Trilliums in Northern Ontario
Northern Ontario
 


 

 


 

The Towns and Cities of Northern Ontario
Blind River Ontario - Algoma Country

As just about every tourist related publication will tell you, Blind River is found about half way between the two major centres of Sudbury and Sault Ste. Marie. Situated right on the TransCanada Highway 17, it's easy to find and easy to get to. Around 4 million travelers a year find their way through Blind River. Because of this steady stream of visitors Blind River has good facilities for shopping and doing business, there are restaurants and fast food places, and there are great places to stay and fun things to do.

There is a marine park in Blind River with facilities for boaters. You'll find barbecue pits, horseshoe pits, food services, full dock services, personal stations, lounge, weekly events, and what many people say is some of the most scenic sailing in the world. This marina is one of the most modern and best harbour complexes in the province.

There is a village museum, there are gift shops, a Regional Travel Centre right on the highway, and everything from first class hotel rooms, rustic campgrounds, to bed & breakfast homes, if you're looking to stay a while.

Needless to say, like all places in Northern Ontario, there's great fishing and angling, ice fishing, golfing, hunting, swimming, hiking, skiing, canoe trips, "fly-in" possibilities, bird watching, wildlife photography opportunities, snowmobiling, and lots of fresh air and sunshine.

Remember, it is a small town, around 4000 people, and as such is somewhat limited in it's choices. If you're looking for excitement in your vacation choices, you might want to consider Blind River a great stop over place along the way. If you're looking for scenic beauty, clean air, and lots of quite time on the water, Blind River could be a great choice for a long and pleasant stay.

Blind River was started in 1853 with a sawmill being built in the area. The government had been promoting the area as a new frontier. Houses were built for the mill workers as they arrived and by the end of the 1800's it was getting large enough to name a few streets. The economy of the area depended for a long time on the logging industry and for a while was known as the Little Mill (Le Petit Moulin). Over the years mining has made it's mark here and today tourism plays a major part in the ongoing success of this little town.

 

 

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